Stop Videos Playing Automatically

Stop Videos Playing Automatically in a few simple steps.

Does it drive you insane when videos in sidebars or embedded randomly through a site begin to play automatically?
It is possible to save your sanity and download limit by preventing this in most common browsers.

How to stop automatically playing ads, videos and media in Chrome

Disabling autoplay videos and media in Chrome is simple. First of all you need to type “chrome://chrome/settings/content” into the URL bar. Then all you need to do is scroll down to the plug-in section, and select ‘Let me choose when to run plugin content’.

How to stop automatically playing ads, videos and media in Firefox

The function can be disabled through the browser’s own settings. Type “about:config” into the address bar, click through the warning and search for “autoplay” options—double-click on media.autoplay.embed and the value changes to false.

How to stop automatically playing ads, videos and media in Internet Explorer

Select “Safety” and tick ActiveX Filtering to block some kinds of content.
Another option is to choose Tools then Manage add-ons to get access to the Shockwave Flash plugin. Right-click to disable it.

How to stop automatically playing ads, videos and media in Microsoft Edge

You can’t – yet.
Just don’t use it 🙂

The steps for IE described above are the ones most commonly recommended, and they stopped some auto-playing content, but plenty still got through.
It seems that Chrome and Firefox are much more effective at blocking this behaviour than either the old or new browsers from Microsoft.

Hottest Technologies on the Web – June 2016

There is always something new in web design, and staying ahead of the latest technology trends is essential in the web design business.

While most new trends will be of little use or interest to many clients, it is interesting to see what developments have been going on.

The website Built With (builtwith.com) analyses websites all over the world to see what new and emergent technologies are in use.

This list shows the current 10 most popular emergent web technologies.

1. ORIENTATION

This might seem a bit of a weird new trend, given the importance of responsiveness in a modern website to enable it to display on all devices, but sometimes, defining the orientation is useful.

In our smart devices (phones and tablets) there is an accelerator that aligns the screen depending on the orientation of the device; it switches between portrait and landscape modes when you rotate the device.

This enables us to create better user experiences because it offers an additional layout with a simple turn of a device, and without pressing any buttons.

However, designing for device orientation brings various challenges and requires careful thinking. The experience must be as unobtrusive and transparent as possible, and we must understand the context of use for this functionality.

 

It is probably a code used more often on single pages within a site than for an entire website, and very handy if you need to control the user experience.

Nearly all websites benefit from being designed for device orientation, but every so often there is a page or a function that will work much better in one orientation. For example, a video or a slideshow might look much better in landscape.

 

2. NEW RELIC

New Relic is a tracing and analytics application that uses a dashboard to monitor the health, availability and user experience on a site.
It’s expensive, but if you really need to know, in real time, what the traffic is uup to on your site, it might be uesful.
I suspect the reason it is at number 2 is because news sites, entertainment sites and political sites have been adopting it recently.

3. Google Universal Analytics Usage Statistics

One of my personal favourites and something I build into every site; this script measures how users interact with your website. It is new development of the well known Google tracking code, with additional flexibility for developers to customise it.

4. Device Width

A very useful code that overcomes that annoying issue we often see with an embedded document, form or picture requiring you to scroll right to see it all on a small screen.
This code allows the programmer to define the maximum width of the object.

5. CDN – Content Delivery Network

Useful for extremely high demand websites, a content delivery network a group of servers deployed in multiple data centres around the world. The purpose is to serve content to end-users with high availability and high speed.

Appropriate for very high volume news sites, entertainment sites and political sites.

6. WordPress 4.5

No surprise here. This is by far the most popular website technology being used today.

Massively flexible and with a brilliant user interface, nothing comes close to WordPress.

WordPress 4.5 is the latest release.

7. Facebook Custom Audiences

This script allows you to select customised audiences from your website that you can then target with Facebook ads and posts.

It does require that the viewer of your website agree to a privacy statement allowing you to track their movements though, so unless you are offering a service people want to be regularly updated on, such as a healthcare blog or a fashion site, it might be seen as something of a barrier for some users.

8. GSAP

A suite of tools for scripted, high-performance HTML5 animations that work in all major browsers.

9. Yahoo Dot

A simple way to measure and improve customer engagement across online campaigns.

For an advertiser who spreads their message and brand through multiple places, Yahoo Dot offers a single tag that enables improved ad effectiveness across search and native ads.

10. Comodo SSL

Comodo SSL (Secured Socket Layer) is an internet security certificate. Using a Secured Socket Layer enables a secure and encrypted connection on the Internet.

Once complicated, now it is easy, thanks to Comodo. And that, combined with a lower cost than older competitors, is probably why it ranks at number 10.

Spam!

Once the spam filters learn of a spammer they block them.
But quite a lot of people have to suffer from their spam activity first.

I remember Steven Fry on QI asking what the bulk of internet traffic was and the answer was over 90% spam.

So if there was a solution I think someone would have become a billionaire with it by now.You know that old saying “there is nothing certain in life but death and taxes”?

I think we need it revised for the 21st century to

“there is nothing certain in life but death, taxes and spam email”

While there are numerous spam filters available, nothing really works 100% all the time, and any spam filter comes with the risk that you will potentially delete emails from new customers, there are some things you can do when spam gets overwhelming.

These are some useful suggestions that are worth knowing about:

  1. Take advantage of the Junk E-mail Filter in your email software which automatically evaluates incoming messages and sends those identified as spam to the Junk E-mail folder.
  2. Use you “block sender” option to block any further emails from a sender.
  3. Block pictures in HTML messages that spammers use as Web beacons. By default, this feature blocks automatic picture downloads and other external content in messages if the content is linked to a server. If you open a message that has external content when this feature is turned off, the external content downloads automatically, inadvertently verifying to the server that your e-mail address is a valid one. Your e-mail address can then be sold to a spammer. You can unblock external content for messages that come from sources that you trust.
  4. Turn off “read and delivery receipts” and automatic processing of meeting requests. Spammers sometimes resort to sending meeting requests and messages that include requests for read and delivery receipts. Responding to such meeting requests and read receipts might help spammers to verify your e-mail address. You can turn off this functionality.
  5. Limit the places where you post your e-mail address. We all need our email addresses on our web sites, but unfortunately whenever you list or link to your e-mail address, you increase your chances of being spammed.
  6. Review the privacy policies of web sites and only join those you need and trust such as online banking, shopping, or newsletters. Look for a link or section (usually at the bottom of the Web site’s home page) called “Privacy Statement,” “Privacy Policy,” “Terms and Conditions,” or “Terms of Use.” If the Web site does not explain how your personal information will be used, consider not using the services at that site.
  7. Watch out for check boxes that are already selected. When you shop online, companies sometimes add a check box that is already selected, which indicates that it is fine with you if the company sells or gives your e-mail address to other businesses (or “third parties”). Clear this check box so that your e-mail address is not shared.
  8. Don’t EVER reply to spam. Never reply to a spam e-mail message — not even to unsubscribe from a mailing list. Answering spam just confirms to the spammer that your e-mail address is an active one.
  9. If a company uses e-mail messages to ask for personal information, don’t respond by sending a message. Legitimate companies will not ask for personal information to be sent in e-mail, so be very suspicious if they do. Such a request could be a spoofed e-mail message disguised to look like a legitimate one. This tactic is known as phishing.
    If the possible spam appears to be sent by a company that you do business with — for example, your credit card company — then call the company to verify that they sent it, but don’t use any phone number that is provided in the e-mail. Instead, use a number that you find by using other means, such as directory assistance, a statement, or a bill. If the request is a legitimate one, the company’s customer service representative should be able to assist you. The Junk E-mail Filter also includes phishing protection to help identify and disable suspicious messages.
  10. Don’t contribute to a charity in response to a request sent in e-mail. Sadly, some spammers prey on your goodwill. If you receive an e-mail appeal from a charity, treat it as spam. If the charity is one that you want to support, locate their telephone number or Web site to find out how you can make a contribution.
  11. Don’t forward chain e-mail messages. apart from the fact that by forwarding a chain e-mail message you might be furthering a hoax, you also lose control over who sees your e-mail address.

What are people saying about you online?

What are people saying about you?
Google Alerts

Know what people are saying about you or your business anywhere on the web (or what they are saying about your competitors for that matter) by using Google Alerts.

You can set up Google Alerts to keep tabs on any person, place, or thing.

Google Alerts sends you an e-mail whenever your key phrase appears anywhere online.

Google Alerts are easy to set up.

  1. Go to https://www.google.com.au/alerts#
  2. Enter your search query.
  3. Choose the kind of results you want. By default, Google Alerts
    will give you “everything,” but you can also narrow the search to
    blogs, books, discussions (within Google Groups), news, and
    video.
  4. Decide how often you want the alert.

You can use Google Alerts to track a key phrase on a single website if you wish. For example, if you want to see what people are saying about Malcolm Turnbull on Facebook you simply type this:

site:facebook.com “Malcolm Turnbull”

As you type, you will see a preview of the results. This can help you tailor the query to get exactly the kind of information you want.

With all your choices made, click Create Alert.
Bookmark your Alert-management page so you can edit or delete alerts as needed.

If a particular result seems out of place, you can click “flag as irrelevant.”